Testing the Oregon Delinquency Model with 9-year Follow-up of the Oregon Divorce Study

The paper illustrates experimental tests performed to a randomized sample comprising 238 single mothers and their elementary school-aged sons using the Oregon delinquency model. The scope of the Oregon Delinquency Model tests arises from the need to ascertain whether ineffective parenting approaches, and deviant association among peers is the primary cause to spread of delinquent behavior among the adolescent. It employs multiple-method assessments including delinquency captured in teacher reports and arrest records, alongside observation of parent-child interactions to examine the parenting skills, equally, the reports from the focal boys to measure deviant association among peers. Analysis of the Oregon Delinquency Model findings revealed that the implementation of the parent management training immensely reduced the police arrests and teacher-reported cases of delinquency. As hypothesized, the results demonstrated that training improved the parenting skills that translated to reduced rates of delinquency among the adolescent. Similarly, it accomplished significant delays in the police arrests, with a varied timing captured of the control group.

Source

  • Forgatch, M. S., Patterson, G. R., Degarmo, D. S., & Beldavs, Z. (2009). Testing the Oregon Delinquency Model with 9-year Follow-up of the Oregon Divorce Study. Development Psychopath, 21(2), 637-660.
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